10 Causes of PTSD in Children

causes of PTSD in children

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental illness vastly under-diagnosed in children. For that reason, I’ve been guest blogging about the topic at Friendship Circle of Michigan’s website. Previous posts in this series explained why I advocate for children with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), explored 5 myths and misconceptions about PTSD in children, and defined both trauma and PTSD from a child’s point of view.

Causes of PTSD in Children

The most recent post in the series identified the following ten causes of PTSD in kids:

  1. Medical intervention
  2. Abuse
  3. Neglect
  4. Disasters
  5. Violent acts
  6. Accidents
  7. Divorce
  8. The death of a significant loved one
  9. Moving
  10. Adoption

Trauma in the Eyes of a Child

If you’re shaking your head and thinking, “She’s pulling my leg. Those aren’t traumatic events,” then you’re looking at them with the eyes of an adult rather than from a child’s point of view. That train of thought and more detailed explanations of each of the ten items on the list can be found at the blog post 10 Causes of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Children at Friendship Circle’s website.

More Articles about PTSD in Children

Other articles about PTSD in kids at this website include:

 

*As of this posting, the book proposal is under consideration at two publishing houses. If you’re interested in being interviewed for the book if a publisher accepts the project, please leave a comment.

Your PTSD Experience

Did you deal with PTSD as a child? Is your child dealing with it now…or do you suspect PTSD? If so, leave a comment about how the condition was diagnosed and treated. Or if you have questions, go ahead and ask. I’ll try to answer or direct you to resources where you can find answers.

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causes of PTSD in children PIN

24 Comments

  1. shelby nuckolls shelby nuckolls
    February 18, 2013    

    Hi Jolene. Thank you for talking and writing about PTSD in children. My 11 year old has been diagnosed with it and severe seperation anxiety disorder due to medical trauma. Both ‘rear their ugly beard’s often in her life. She doesn’t want it to happen and hares it when it does. The more adults can learn about this the better possiblity the children who suffer from it will have to recover. Thank you so much

  2. shelby nuckolls shelby nuckolls
    February 18, 2013    

    Hi Jolene. Thank you for talking and writing about PTSD in children. My 11 year old has been diagnosed with it and severe seperation anxiety disorder due to medical trauma. Both ‘rear their ugly beard’s often in her life. She doesn’t want it to happen and hares it when it does. The more adults can learn about this the better possiblity the children who suffer from it will have to recover. Thank you so much

  3. February 19, 2013    

    Dear Shelby,

    You are most welcome. I’m sorry to hear your daughter is still struggling with PTSD and the accompanying anxiety. Her story is one reason I write about the subject and am trying to get a publisher interested enough to pick up my book project.

    Praying for you,
    Jolene

  4. February 19, 2013    

    Dear Shelby,

    You are most welcome. I’m sorry to hear your daughter is still struggling with PTSD and the accompanying anxiety. Her story is one reason I write about the subject and am trying to get a publisher interested enough to pick up my book project.

    Praying for you,
    Jolene

  5. February 19, 2013    

    Hi Jolene,

    Thanks for all you do in behalf of kids and parents with regard to children and PTSD. I had PTSD as an infant and child but didn’t know it. My parents did not either. My PTSD resulted from an infant surgery likely done without anesthetic and/or adequate pain control. In kindergarten, I apparently isolated myself a lot. Because of my wonderful teacher, Miss Anderson, I was able to make a leap in healing. She asked my mother in for a consultation, where my mother told her about my difficult beginning. She told the teacher all about the surgery I had and the adjustment period when I got home from the hospital. From this discussion, the teacher created a plan. Every day she sat me with the same 3 children for snack. I don’t remember, but my mother tells me that I was able to begin to socialize with the other children. Funny that the only thing I can recall about kindergarten is doing things alone or with the teacher or with the group and the teacher leading. But I also remember loving kindergarten so her intervention saved me. More parents and teachers need to know about PTSD in children. Good luck with getting your book published. I will be sure to advertise it on myincision. Perhaps you could do a guest post about it.

  6. February 19, 2013    

    Hi Jolene,

    Thanks for all you do in behalf of kids and parents with regard to children and PTSD. I had PTSD as an infant and child but didn’t know it. My parents did not either. My PTSD resulted from an infant surgery likely done without anesthetic and/or adequate pain control. In kindergarten, I apparently isolated myself a lot. Because of my wonderful teacher, Miss Anderson, I was able to make a leap in healing. She asked my mother in for a consultation, where my mother told her about my difficult beginning. She told the teacher all about the surgery I had and the adjustment period when I got home from the hospital. From this discussion, the teacher created a plan. Every day she sat me with the same 3 children for snack. I don’t remember, but my mother tells me that I was able to begin to socialize with the other children. Funny that the only thing I can recall about kindergarten is doing things alone or with the teacher or with the group and the teacher leading. But I also remember loving kindergarten so her intervention saved me. More parents and teachers need to know about PTSD in children. Good luck with getting your book published. I will be sure to advertise it on myincision. Perhaps you could do a guest post about it.

  7. February 20, 2013    

    Thanks, for addressing this subject. I see it in a lot of places. Often times another diagnosis such adhd or various learning disabilities mask it. I work with a lot of children who’ve been adopted. They often have the symptoms for PTSD but it seems like it gets missed. Thanks again, for looking at this topic.

  8. February 20, 2013    

    Thanks, for addressing this subject. I see it in a lot of places. Often times another diagnosis such adhd or various learning disabilities mask it. I work with a lot of children who’ve been adopted. They often have the symptoms for PTSD but it seems like it gets missed. Thanks again, for looking at this topic.

  9. February 20, 2013    

    Hi Jolene,
    I am definitely interested in being interviewed for your book if you think a narrative of my experience might be of use.

  10. February 20, 2013    

    Hi Jolene,
    I am definitely interested in being interviewed for your book if you think a narrative of my experience might be of use.

  11. February 21, 2013    

    Thanks for your well wishes, Wendy, and for the story of your remarkably perceptive kindergarten teacher. The world needs more teachers like her.

    Jolene

  12. February 21, 2013    

    Thanks for your well wishes, Wendy, and for the story of your remarkably perceptive kindergarten teacher. The world needs more teachers like her.

    Jolene

  13. February 21, 2013    

    Dear Ruth,

    Your words are very wise. PTSD is often misdiagnosed as ADHD or bipolar disorder. It also can affect learning because it’s hard for children to focus on new information when they’re constantly on edge, waiting for the next terrible thing to happen. PTSD is more treatable than the misdiagnoses and treatment can minimize learning problems. That’s why I keep writing about this topic–to inform parents so kids get the help they need.

    Jolene

  14. February 21, 2013    

    Dear Ruth,

    Your words are very wise. PTSD is often misdiagnosed as ADHD or bipolar disorder. It also can affect learning because it’s hard for children to focus on new information when they’re constantly on edge, waiting for the next terrible thing to happen. PTSD is more treatable than the misdiagnoses and treatment can minimize learning problems. That’s why I keep writing about this topic–to inform parents so kids get the help they need.

    Jolene

  15. Margaret Margaret
    April 25, 2013    

    Hi Jolene
    First I want to THANK YOU for being one of, what seems like, very few who address the issue of PTSD in children and for validating that children DO have FEELINGS and gone unrecognized, they can become very troublesome for these children as adults.

    Thank you so much for doing what you do!!
    M

  16. Margaret Margaret
    April 25, 2013    

    Hi Jolene
    First I want to THANK YOU for being one of, what seems like, very few who address the issue of PTSD in children and for validating that children DO have FEELINGS and gone unrecognized, they can become very troublesome for these children as adults.

    Thank you so much for doing what you do!!
    M

  17. April 26, 2013    

    Dear M,

    Thank you so much for your feedback and for sharing your story. I read every word, but thought it wisest not to put all of it on the blog for the world to see. I wholeheartedly agree that these little boys are dealing with PTSD and am so sorry about what they’ve experienced. If you want more information about treatment possibilities, please let me know.

    Best wishes,
    Jolene

  18. April 26, 2013    

    Dear M,

    Thank you so much for your feedback and for sharing your story. I read every word, but thought it wisest not to put all of it on the blog for the world to see. I wholeheartedly agree that these little boys are dealing with PTSD and am so sorry about what they’ve experienced. If you want more information about treatment possibilities, please let me know.

    Best wishes,
    Jolene

  19. Margaret Margaret
    April 26, 2013    

    Thank you Jolene, for taking the time to read my post and too, for editing it down to the basics…. 😉 I would be VERY open to more info and treatment possibilities, thank you!! Anything you can share will be appreciated tons!!

    Gos Bless!
    M

  20. Margaret Margaret
    April 26, 2013    

    Thank you Jolene, for taking the time to read my post and too, for editing it down to the basics…. 😉 I would be VERY open to more info and treatment possibilities, thank you!! Anything you can share will be appreciated tons!!

    Gos Bless!
    M

  21. Margaret Margaret
    April 26, 2013    

    *GoD Bless! 😉

  22. Margaret Margaret
    April 26, 2013    

    *GoD Bless! 😉

  23. May 4, 2013    

    You’re welcome!

  24. May 4, 2013    

    You’re welcome!

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Meet Jolene

Jolene Philo is a published author, speaker, wife, and mother of a son with special needs.

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